Social Support and Crack/Cocaine Use Among Incarcerated Mothers and Nonmothers

RUHRC Authors: Harp, K
Publication Date: 05/01/2012
Full Publication: Social Support and Crack/Cocaine Use Among Incarcerated Mothers and Nonmothers

Abstract

Few studies have examined the interplay between motherhood, social support, and substance use in incarcerated female samples. Existing research demonstrates the positive effect of social support on the ability to cope with stressful life events and recover from illness and substance use problems (Cobb, 1976; Gottlieb, 1981; Stephens, 1987; Wilcox, 1988). Given the number of life problems and strains incarcerated women with substance use problems face, the present study examines whether adequate social support is related to a decrease in daily self-reported crack/cocaine use in a sample of mothers and non-mothers who are incarcerated. The importance of social support for mothers may be even greater among those who are incarcerated, as their lives are characterized by more stressful events than incarcerated men or non-incarcerated women (Glaze & Maruschak, 2008). The present study compares the characteristics and life circumstances of mothers and non-mothers and examines the relationship between perceived social support and daily use of crack/cocaine for both groups of women.

Suggested Citation

Harp KLH, Oser CB, Leukefeld C. Social Support and Crack/Cocaine Use Among Incarcerated Mothers and Nonmothers. Subst Use Misuse. 2012; 47(6):686–694.